Awesome Indies: Omnilogos by Michele Amitrani

Posted June 10, 2016 by Emily in Awesome Indie / 0 Comments

Awesome Indie header

For more information, check out the Awesome Indies page

Awesome Indies: Omnilogos by Michele AmitraniOmnilogos: Extended Edition (The Omnilogos Series Book 1) by Michele Amitrani
on September 16. 2015
Genres: Sci Fi
Pages: 265
Buy on Amazon

“I am a collector of hopes and peregrine truths, a shepherd of thoughts, ideas, projects and dreams too important not to be realized. I’m an abstract concept that has no body, no smell, no boundaries, no shape and no color.
I am the Omnilogos.”

So it is forged, a Science Fiction saga that gave birth to a legend, a tale about the life of a man with one project that will change mankindÂ’s future forever. Ten stories about his life, his sorrow, and his quest to gather the resources and the people needed to claim our place among the stars.

This is WeiÂ’s story.

This is the world of the Omnilogos.

How long did this book take you to write?

Omnilogos was not an easy book to write. Lot of researches had to be done to make the story sound believable and compelling. I wrote the book in Italian first (I was born and raised in Italy, English is just my second language). It took me around three years and a half to finish writing it. I then decided to translate it into English by myself and to have it revised by several beta readers and proofreaders, a process that took another full year. LetÂ’s say around four years to have the final product (Omnilogos: Extended Edition) ready to be published the way I really wanted.

How do you develop your plots and characters?

The way I develop my plots is slowly evolving and becoming more systematized, so to speak. With Omnilogos, for instance, I usually wrote a chapter having in mind primarily the next chapter, or the previous one, with just a general idea of the overall plot. However with its sequel, Pelargonium, and the following books of the series, IÂ’m trying to develop the whole plot first, and then write the single chapters. I donÂ’t always succeed in doing this. Sometimes I just canÂ’t help to write a chapter, and restructure part of the plot around it. So I guess the answer to your question is: ‘I donÂ’t always craft the story, usually the story craft itselfÂ’. The way I develop my characters, on the other hand, remained pretty much the same over the years. My characters develop as I write them. I almost never have any character figure out before I actually write about them. ItÂ’s what I might call a ‘create as you goÂ’ kind of approach, but IÂ’ve noticed that this is what keeps me wanting to know more about them. ItÂ’s like exploring an unknown cave, and getting familiar to it as you procede further, rather than simply walking inside a house you builded from scratch. Not sure If what I say makes any sense to you. I can be quite confusing, at times 🙂

Did you learn anything from writing this book and what was it?

Over the years I realized that when some people think of the ‘writing process’, they picture the writer sitting in front of a desk, sipping coffee or tea, silence surrounding everything, and the words pouring out of the pen effortlessly. I know this because I used to be one of these people. When I was a teenager I would write only if I felt inspired and there were the ‘right’ conditions. Now that I became a self-published author, and I decided to meet deadlines and to publish at least one book per year, my ‘writing sessions’ became much more similar to a wrestling match. This ‘new phase’ began precisely when I decided to publish Omnilogos. If I’ve learned anything from writing this book is that I have to fight to get every single word out, and when they do come out I almost always don’t like them, so I have to rewrite the whole thing, over and over again. If you think this sucks well…it does! I remember once I heard an interview of a popular author (I can’t remember his name) who described the entire writing process as a painful experience. He actually used the word ‘sucks’ and I think I know what he meant. Writing a book is really hard, especially if you don’t have a really strong reason to finish it. Sometimes you just want to quit, to abandon you story and let it die. I have a huge respect for every single author that actually finish to write a book and publish it. I know the effort behind the whole process.

Is any part of the book based on someone you know or events in your own life?

Omnilogos opens with Wei watching the departure of the Space Shuttle Atlantis lifting off from Cape Canaveral. I myself was there for that historic event, the last Space Shuttle to depart from Earth, and I have to admit I was really inspired by that moment. In a way, the departure of the Atlantis was what ignited the whole Omnilogos Series.

What book are you reading now?

I’m reading a fantasy saga written by Robert Jordan. It’s called ‘The Wheel of Time’, and I have to say that so far it’s one of the best book series I’ve ever read. It is easily becoming one of my favorite series. It’s engaging, incredibly well written and full of plot twists. I’m now about to finish the seventh book of the Series. Every book is quite big (usually around 800-1000 pages long) so it seems like I’ve been reading the Wheel of Time for ages, although I actually started the Series less than two years ago. I highly recommend it to Fantasy fans!

Can you share a little of your current work with us?

IÂ’m currently writing the third book of the Omnilogos Series (in Italian). IÂ’m planning to publish it at the end of 2016. The second book of the Omnilogos Series, Pelargonium, was released three months ago. Of course I will need to translate it from Italian into English. The only problem is that Pelargonium is three times bigger than Omnilogos. That means that if I translate it by myself the way I did with Omnilogos, it will take around three years to complete the translation. Now that I think about it, do you know any good translator? 🙂

How much research do you do?

I try to be as accurate as possible, especially when IÂ’m talking about something IÂ’m not familiar with. For instance, in Omnilogos I describe an object which could be used to make space exploration less expansive and more viable. I knew nothing about this specific object, and I figured I needed to study more to actually sound like I knew what I was talking about. Therefore, before writing the portion of the book that presented this object, I decided to read a few essays, watch documentaries, Youtube videos, check out Reddit trends and forums in order to familiarize with the idea. I do the same every time I fell that a deeper knowledge is required to make the story flow better.

Do you have a set writing schedule that you adhere to? / Tell us how you write

I try to write every day, except on weekends, a period of time usually dedicated to develop the plot, rather than to actually write the story. This choice also helps me to pause and to reflect on what I wrote so far, while I try to strengthen the story or enrich it with new concepts. I usually write around 6000 words per week (rarely more than 30,000 per month). My all time record is 61,700 words written on July 2015. I like to keep track of how much I write every day, to be able to compare every monthÂ’s achievement. I believe this is also the way I remind myself that writing a book is like building a castle. ItÂ’s not something you achieve in a day or two. It takes time and effort. You have to be the first person to believe in your story. Discipline and passion are the two things that keep me from abandon everything.

If this book is part of a series, tell us a little about it?

One person who reviewed Omnilogos said quite simply that: “The Omnilogos Series makes people wonder about the future of the human race and what opportunities the stars might hold.” And another one commented: “One way to think about this novel is that it is a story of dreaming with the objective of reaching the stars. With every dream of this magnitude, however, there is a price to pay…” I think these two phrases summarize very well the entire concept of the Series. Omnilogos tells us of what the humanity could become, if we’ll ever aspire to become a spacefaring civilization.

How can readers discover more about you and you work?

You can find me on my website www.MicheleAmitrani.com, browsing books on Goodreads or hanging out on Facebook at /MicheleAmitraniAuthor. Thank you again for giving me the chance to speak about myself and my books, Emily.

Website: http://www.micheleamitrani.com/
Blog: (in Italian) http://www.credinellatuastoria.com/blog/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MicheleAmitraniAuthor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MicheleAmitrani
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/edit?goback=%2Enas_*1_*1_*1&trk=nprofile-save-picture-settings-submit&report%2Esuccess=88GfZh25oYpGMv_ncXhqwkk2axsD1cOiNrQErX7HNxy7raoMejQEhfBsYJTYoZpJLJh9oM
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/micheleamitrani/
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Michele-Amitrani/e/B00I2GMEAI

Book Links: (* American, UK, etc.)

AMAZON USA: http://www.amazon.com/Omnilogos-Extended-Book-1-ebook/dp/B015HR1KKO/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8
AMAZON UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Omnilogos-Extended-1-Michele-Amitrani/dp/0994066309/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1459274745&sr=8-1&keywords=omnilogos
AMAZON CA: https://www.amazon.ca/Omnilogos-Extended-Book-1-ebook/dp/B015HR1KKO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1459274716&sr=8-2&keywords=omnilogos
AMAZON IT:  http://www.amazon.it/dp/B00QVWCUPE/ref=pdp_new_dp_review
KOBO: https://store.kobobooks.com/en-ca/ebook/omnilogos-1
B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/omnilogos-michele-amitrani/1122907858?ean=9780994066305
iTUNES:  https://itunes.apple.com/it/book/omnilogos-extended-edition/id1054950109?l=en&mt=11
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8160011.Michele_Amitrani

Tags:

Divider

Leave a Reply