Genre: Urban Fantasy

How to write a book when you live with your parents

Posted February 19, 2018 by Emily in Events and Features, Guest Post / 0 Comments

By: S. Usher Evans

*** From Emily*** Sush has started an incredible campaign to be debt free by selling books and flipping houses. Her house flipping Instagram is fantastic. (https://www.instagram.com/housesfullofwhit/) Plus she’s prolific author. Demon Spring is her third series but she has books planned out til 2020! She’s the only person I know who has such a concrete plan for her life. I admire her for it so much! Her story is incredible and she’s here today to share with us a little bit about how she makes it work***

Hi, I’m Sush, I’m 31, and I live with my parents. 

No, I’m not your typical millennial. I’m a house-flipping full-time author, and I decided about a year ago to sell my house, move in with my folks temporarily, and then buy and flip houses until I could live without a mortgage plus have a few renters on the side. While I could write a novel on what I learned this year alone with house flipping, today I want to talk about how I was able to complete my latest series, Demon Spring, while living with my folks.

My folks are wonderful people and I am eternally grateful that I was able to live with them so I could position myself into a more debt-free life. However, after living by myself since 2011, having other humans in the house was definitely a change. Writing, for me anyway, has always been something done in private. And not only that, when I’m anxious, I have a hard time focusing (which leads to more anxiety). Living with a retired mom who’s always around has been a challenge.

But it’s not insurmountable. So I’ve listed a few coping mechanisms I’ve developed that helped me stay on track this year.

  1. Noise-canceling Bluetooth headphones

This one kind of goes without saying. The nice thing about Bluetooth headphones is you can get up and walk around with them on. So you don’t get the interruption to your music when you get up to munch.

  1. Classical music

I have ADD (or whatever they’re calling it now), so sometimes, music with lyrics just distracts me further. When I’m feeling especially scattered, I’ll go with some classical music on Pandora. A few months ago, I bought the London Symphony Orchestra’s 50 greatest classical pieces. That way, I can turn off the internet when things get tough, and still have my Carmen.

  1. Have your own space

To make matters more complicated, I work from home. The first thing I did when I moved into my parents’ house was to set up an office. A place with a monitor and keyboard and my stuff where I can plug in my laptop, close the door, and get to work. The dogs, of course, come barging right in. But the space is mine.

  1. Starbucks

There’s something about leaving the house, going to a coffee shop, and plugging in your headphones that knocks all the anxious, unfocused thoughts out of my brain. I wrote probably three quarters of Demon Spring at the Gulf Breeze Starbucks. Find a routine that works for you—and use those free rewards when you get them.

  1. Give yourself a break

Especially if you’re in a temporary space, you have to allow yourself the space to fail. Some days, the anxiety and the noise was too great, and words didn’t get written. Some days, I spent the day holed up in my room with headphones to catch up. The point is: you’ve got this. Just maybe not as perfectly as you envisioned when you came up with this crazy scheme.

Divider

About the Book

How to write a book when you live with your parentsResurgence by S. Usher Evans
Series: Demon Spring #1
Published by Sun's Golden Ray Publishing on February 20th 2018
Genres: Adult, Urban Fantasy
Format: Paperback
Source: the author
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
four-half-stars

Demon hunter Jack Grenard's life changed three years ago when his wife was brutally murdered by the very demons he'd been hunting. At the urging of his partner Cam Macarro, he's starting a new life in Atlanta, hoping he'll find the man he used to be. But on a routine hunt, they come across a new type of demon--one that saves instead of kills.

Meanwhile, demons across Atlanta are preparing for the quadrennial uprising of their Underworld brethren. Worse yet, there's a rumor the so-called king of the demons, Bael, will appear for the first time in over a century. Jack and Cam must uncover the truth about the mystery woman before all hell--literally--breaks loose.

Resurgence is the first in a new Urban Fantasy trilogy from S. Usher Evans, author of the Madion War Trilogy, Razia, and Lexie Carrigan Chronicles. It will be released by Sun's Golden Ray Publishing in February 2018.

Amazon – Barnes and Noble – IndieBound – Book Depository

Divider

About the Author

S. Usher Evans is an author, blogger, and witty banter aficionado. Born in Pensacola, Florida, she left the sleepy town behind for the fast-paced world of Washington, D.C.. There, she somehow landed jobs with BBC, Discovery Channel, and National Geographic Television before finally settling into a “real job” as an IT consultant. After a quarter life crisis at age 27, she decided consulting was for the birds and rekindled a childhood passion for writing novels. She sold everything she owned and moved back to Pensacola, where she currently resides with her two dogs, Zoe and Mr. Biscuit.

Evans is the author of the Razia series, Madion War Trilogy, and Empath, published by Sun’s Golden Ray Publishing.

Author links: 
Divider

Giveaway

a Rafflecopter giveaway

four-half-stars

Tags:

Divider

Review: Society of Wishes by Elise Kova and Lynn Larsh

Posted January 10, 2018 by Emily in Review / 1 Comment

Review: Society of Wishes by Elise Kova and Lynn LarshSociety of Wishes by Elise Kova, Lynn Larsh
Series: Society of Wishes #1
Published by Silver Wing Press on January 29th 2018
Genres: Urban Fantasy, New Adult
Format: ebook
Source: the author
Buy on Amazon
Goodreads
three-half-stars

First book in the Wish Quartet, a new-adult, urban fantasy series

BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR.

Josephina Espinosa makes her living as a hacker-for-hire in the Lone Star Republic, a remnant of the fractured U.S.A. That is, until the day she and her best friend are gunned down in a government raid.

With her dying breath, Jo uses magical lore passed down from her grandmother to summon a wish-granter. Her wish? To save her friend’s life. Except wishes have costs, and for Jo, the price is the erasure of her entire mortal existence.

Now, as the most recent addition to the mysterious Society of Wishes, Jo must form a new “life” alongside the seven other members, one of which being her savior himself. Living as an occupant of the Society’s lavish mansion should be quite the perk, but while it is furnished with everything its inhabitants could possibly need, it lacks one thing—freedom.

Her otherworldly identity crisis takes a backseat, however, when Jo learns that the friend she sacrificed everything for is headed down the same path to ruin. Jumping in head-first, Jo uses her newfound magical abilities to protect him, only to realize that the ripples of her actions have far-reaching consequences. When the Society’s aloof leader Snow decides to give her a taste of his own ancient magic, Jo discovers that there are threads woven into the tapestry of her new reality that reach far beyond the wishes she is now required to grant. Ones that, if tugged on, could mean the unraveling of her existence itself.

I received this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

I was really excited that I got the chance to read this one early. I’ve been on pins and needles for it since Elise announced that she was writing an Urban Fantasy novel last year. Urban Fantasy has always been my favorite genre! I love weird and supernatural. Then I found out that this was also going to be Elise’s first New Adult book. That makes this book a combination of my absolute favorite genre and my least favorite age range. After reading it, I can see why she categorized it as New Adult. Jo Espinosa, the MC is 19 but this book could just as easily be categorized as Adult.

The Good

I absolutely loved the premise. Jo Espinosa, with her dying wish, cries out a plea that her friend and family be spared. It’s granted and she pays with her existence. She ‘wakes up’ except now she has never been born and she is instead a part of the Society of Wishes. A Magical team that joins together to grant wishes that are chosen by their leader, the mysterious Snow.

The team is endlessly fascinating. I want to get to know each and every one of them in depth. They each became a part of the team over time as payment for a wish, but what was each wish that was granted? I want to know what they wished for! All 6 other members have their own stories that I can’t wait to learn. They also have their own magical talents that they bring to aide the team. I have my favorites already. This book was very character driven with different personalities coming together to build a great team.

This book is like a Heist story flipped on its head. Instead of building a team to go out and steal something, Snow has put together the perfect team to build something, to grant wishes. I just love the concept. It gives me warm fuzzies.

This book was also a quick read. It’s engaging and it flows quickly from setting the stage to getting into the action. I read it in one day.

The Bad

I didn’t feel like there was any urgency, weight or stakes to anyone’s decisions. Jo makes a semi questionable decision that causes a second semi questionable thing to happen and we are told that it’s bad because it could cause a wish to not be granted. If the wish isn’t granted, then a disease will not be cured and lots of people will die. Jo has help, but the guy who helps her is just publicly shamed. There are not really any consequences above and beyond the moral ones. What are these people’s motivations for granting wishes? Why do they bother and why should I care?

I was also really disappointed in the lack of an overarching conflict that flows to the next book. There’s no real villain, problem or conflict in this book at all. They grant wishes. They’ve never failed at granting a wish yet. In the next book they will probably grant more wishes. Character information will also be revealed about the other 6 Society Members and its leader, Snow. I want the character information. Don’t get me wrong. My favorite part of this book was the team that I can’t wait to get to know better. However, I also would have liked something opposing them, maybe like an Society of Curses, to make things more interesting. Right now I don’t feel a burning need to continue. 

I loved the characters and the premise but I felt there is something fundamental missing from the plot. I am still committed to the series and I can’t wait to learn more about the characters. It just felt like something is missing too.

three-half-stars

Tags:

Divider